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Category Archives: Health

Sex is healthy when it is natural

Sex is a normal action for any living organism. Be it humans, animals, birds or reptiles. Without sex, reproduction or survival is not possible. Reproduction happens when the male genital fluid fuses with the ovum of the female. It happens when the semen containing the sperm, flows through the female reproductive tract and fuses with the ovum in the uterus. When the healthy spermatozoa fertilize the ovum, reproduction starts. The semen contains 400 to 500 million sperm in its fluid. But only one healthy sperm fertilizes the ovary. If this does not happen, the male is said to be impotent. Impotency is the inefficiency to get conceived.

Natural ways of penis enlargement

Impotency or sperm ejaculation becomes a failure when the penis is not fully erect. Half erect penis also fails to eject the sperm. It is important to naturally increase the size of the penis. Exercise helps in increasing the size of the penis to about 18 cm by pumping blood to the penis tissue present inside. This will automatically erect the penis and keeps it erected for a long time. There are exercises for penis enlargement which can be done to increase the size. Taking supplements to enlarge penis can have side effects on other parts of the body and on body function. It is always important to consult doctor before taking artificial non-medical prescribed supplements. External application of creams and gel may help to some extent as they do not affect the body internally.

Artificial gels and creams

There are methods of surgery for penis enlargement which are painful. For those who do not want to feel the pain or any hustle process, titan gel pret is an option. It is cheaper and painless yet effective. The gel when applied to the penis 30 to 40 minutes before any sexual act helps in penis enlargement by supplying blood flow to the penis tissue. The product has a great customer feedback due to which the production of the titan gel pret is also high. The gel does justice to what it is prepared for in less than 10 days.

 

Online websites that deliver food supplements at our doorstep!

Everyone wants to lead a healthy and a happy life which is possible only with the proper maintenance of their body health. In order to remain healthy, balanced intake of nutrition contents, minerals vitamins, proteins are essential. This is not easy as people think, especially not with the current environmental changes and the modified lifestyles. Thus it becomes necessary to have a basic understanding of the nutrition requirements of the human body. Food supplements that we consume play a major role in determining the health of the individual. Fruits and vegetables are the natural sources of these nutrient compounds. Thus consuming them would be the ideal way for restoring the energy to the human body. But with the increased business processes, it provides us with the little time to look for the food supplements. But with the improvement in the technology has provided us the solution. These food supplements are made available online so it becomes an easy task to place an order from these products. Even the fruit juices are made available online which in turn could be referred as ejuice.

Purchasing food supplements are made easy!

With the food supplements made available online, it becomes essential to select the website that provides the quality products that do not cause any side effects. There are various factors that are involved in the selection of the websites. People preference and the speed of product delivery play a major role. And the preference of the people directly depends on the quality of the product obtained and the level of customer service provided.  These websites greatly reduce the human effort for searching food supplements. These websites categorize the products based on their nature and consumption. And they also provide various filters that help in selection. It provides the products in various quantities that can be selected by the individual. For an example consider juices (ejuice) that are available both 30 ml and 120 ml packs. And these websites provide an online mode of payment methods and also provides free shipping offers for the products above $30. These websites also provide the facility to select the carrier for transport that delivers the products to the customers. Thus these websites have been very useful for business people in maintaining their health.

 

How to Eat a Healthy Diet

If you are what you eat, it follows that you want to stick to a healthy diet that’s well balanced. “You want to eat a variety of foods,” says Stephen Bickston, MD, AGAF, professor of internal medicine and director of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center at Virginia Commonwealth University Health Center in Richmond. “You don’t want to be overly restrictive of any one food group or eat too much of another.”

Healthy Diet: The Building Blocks

The best source of meal planning for most Americans is the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food Pyramid. The pyramid, updated in 2005, suggests that for a healthy diet each day you should eat:

  • 6 to 8 servings of grains. These include bread, cereal, rice, and pasta, and at least 3 servings should be from whole grains. A serving of bread is one slice while a serving of cereal is 1/2 (cooked) to 1 cup (ready-to-eat). A serving of rice or pasta is 1/2 cup cooked (1 ounce dry). Save fat-laden baked goods such as croissants, muffins, and donuts for an occasional treat.
  • 2 to 4 servings of fruits and 4 to 6 servings of vegetables. Most fruits and vegetables are naturally low in fat, making them a great addition to your healthy diet. Fruits and vegetables also provide the fiber, vitamins, and minerals you need for your body’s systems to function at peak performance. Fruits and vegetables also will add flavor to a healthy diet. It’s best to serve them fresh, steamed, or cut up in salads. Be sure to skip the calorie-laden toppings, butter, and mayonnaise, except on occasion. A serving of raw or cooked vegetables is equal to 1/2 cup (1 cup for leafy greens); a serving of a fruit is 1/2 cup or a fresh fruit the size of a tennis ball.
  • 2 to 3 servings of milk, yogurt, and cheese. Choose dairy products wisely. Go for fat-free or reduced-fat milk or cheeses. Substitute yogurt for sour cream in many recipes and no one will notice the difference. A serving of dairy is equal to 1 cup of milk or yogurt or 1.5 to 2 ounces of cheese.
  • 2 to 3 servings of meat, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, and nuts. For a healthy diet, the best ways to prepare beef, pork, veal, lamb, poultry, and fish is to bake or broil them. Look for the words “loin” or “round” in cuts of meats because they’re the leanest. Remove all visible fat or skin before cooking, and season with herbs, spices, and fat-free marinades. A serving of meat, fish, or poultry is 2 to 3 ounces. Some crossover foods such as dried beans, lentils, and peanut butter can provide protein without the animal fat and cholesterol you get from meats. A ¼ cup cooked beans or 1 tablespoon of peanut butter is equal to 1 ounce of lean meat.
  • Use fats, oils, and sweets sparingly. No diet should totally eliminate any one food group, even fats, oils, and sweets. It’s fine to include them in your diet as long as it’s on occasion and in moderation, Bickston says.

Healthy Diet: Eat Right and the Right Amount

How many calories you need in a day depends on your sex, age, body type, and how active you are. Generally, active children ages 2 to 8 need between 1,400 and 2,000 calories a day. Active teenage girls and women can consume about 2,200 calories a day without gaining weight. Teenage boys and men who are very active should consume about 3,000 calories a day to maintain their weight. If you’re not active, you calorie needs drop by 400 to 600 calories a day.

The best way to know how much to eat is to listen to your body, says Donald Novey, MD, an integrative medicine physician with the Advocate Medical Group in Park Ridge, Ill. “Pull away from the table when you’re comfortable but not yet full. Wait about 20 minutes,” he says. “Usually your body says, ‘That’s good.’ If you’re still hungry after that, you might want to eat a little more.”

Healthy Diet: Exercise Is Part of the Plan

At the bottom of the new USDA food pyramid is a space for exercise. Exercise is an important component of a well-balanced diet and good nutrition. You can reap “fabulous rewards,” says Dr Novey, just by exercising and eating “a healthy diet of foods that nature provides.”

The Truth About Radiation Exposure

Japan’s ongoing nuclear crisis understandably has people around the world worried about radiation exposure and the potential health risks it may pose. According to the latest reports, radiation from Japan was detected in Southern California late this week, but experts are quick to point out that the levels are far from dangerous. The readings were “about a billion times beneath levels that would be health threatening,” a diplomat with access to United Nations’ radiation tracking told the Associated Press.

Nor is it unexpected. “Whenever radioactive particles get in the atmosphere, they have the potential to spread around the world,” says James Thrall, MD, president of the American College of Radiology. “But they get diluted as they travel, so they’re unlikely to pose any real health problem.”

In fact, we’re probably exposed to significantly more radiation every day than the miniscule fallout arriving from Japan. Here’s a quick tutorial on radiation to put our collective anxiety in perspective:

What Is Radiation?

Radiation is a form of energy in waves. It exists on a spectrum, with low-frequency radiation (from radio waves and microwaves) on the low end and high-frequency radiation (from gamma rays and x-rays) on the high end. All radiation affects the cells in our bodies to some extent, but the lower the frequency of the waves and the lower the exposure, the less dangerous it is.

To understand the risks of high-frequency radiation — the kind we’re talking about in this article — think back to high school physics: These waves have enough energy to knock electrons off molecules, which can cause damage to cell DNA that can ultimately lead to cancer.

How Are We Exposed to Radiation?

We encounter radiation each day from a variety of sources. The average American is exposed to about 6 millisieverts (mSv) of radiation annually, according to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Half of this typically comes from background radiation that occurs naturally in the environment, and half comes from medical tests, such as X-rays, mammograms, and CT scans.

According to Kelly Classic, MS, spokesperson for the Health Physics Society, sources of environmental radiation include:

  • Radioactive compounds in soil and building materials like concrete, brick, and stone
  • Radiation from outer space that your encounter when you fly on airplanes or visit high-altitude places
  • The mineral potassium in your own body (a small fraction of potassium, which our bodies need to function, is radioactive)
  • Radon gas in the home, which accounts for about 2 mSv of exposure each year, and is the largest contributor of background radiation

Finally, there’s the kind of radiation released during nuclear reactions, such as what’s disseminating from Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi plant.

Here’s a look at various sources of radiation exposure (dose of radiation in millisieverts (mSv)), according to data from the Health Physics Society and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). By way of comparison, a single dose of radiation below 0.01 mSv is considered negligible by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  • Banana: 0.0001
  • Dental X-ray: 0.005
  • Living within 50 miles of a nuclear power plant: 0.01 (per year)
  • A flight from New York to Los Angeles: 0.04
  • Smoking 1 ½ packs of cigarettes: 0.08
  • Chest X-ray: 0.1
  • Living at sea level: 0.25 (per year)
  • Mammogram: 0.3
  • Living in Denver: 0.5 (per year)
  • Abdominal CT scan: 14
  • Measures between reactors No. 3 and No. 4 during the March 15 explosion at the Fukushima plant: As high as 400 per hour

What Level of Radiation Exposure Is Safe?

It’s well-established that exposure to large amounts of radiation at once can cause acute sickness and even cancer. (A 1,000 mSv-dose can trigger acute radiation sickness, causing symptoms such as nausea and vomiting; 3,000 mSV can be lethal, according to Thrall.)

But there’s no good data on the long-term risks of the low levels of radiation to which we’re continually exposed.

According to the World Nuclear Association, annual exposure to 100 mSv or greater carries a measurable, though small, increase in cancer risk. Below that level, it’s believed that your body’s cells are able to heal themselves from radiation. “There are enzyme systems in the body that repair damage from these low levels of background radiation,” says Thrall.

But even small levels of radiation exposure may impact cancer risks later in life.

This has been of particular concern in the medical community, where some experts worry that increasing use of diagnostic CT scans (which has skyrocketed from 3 million annual scans nationwide in 1980 to 70 million in 2007, according to MedPage Today) will impact future cancer rates. For example, in one 2009 study, National Cancer Institute researchers estimated that one in 270 women and one in 595 men who had a heart CT at age 40 would eventually develop cancer related to the test.

While the health benefits of necessary diagnostic imaging usually outweigh the small risks of secondary cancers, it’s always a good idea to talk to your doctor before any procedure involving radiation to understand exactly what you’re getting, why you need it, and what the potential health risks may be.

Simple Saliva Test Detects Your ‘Real’ Age

A new test that uses a saliva sample to predict a person’s age within a five-year range could prove useful in solving crimes and improving patient care, University of California, Los Angeles geneticists say.

Their test focuses on a process called methylation, a chemical modification of one of the four building blocks that make up DNA.

“While genes partly shape how our body ages, environmental influences also can change our DNA as we age. Methylation patterns shift as we grow older and contribute to aging-related disease,” principal investigator Dr. Eric Vilain, a professor of human genetics, pediatrics and urology, said in a UCLA news release.

He and his colleagues analyzed saliva samples from 34 pairs of identical male twins, aged 21 to 55, and identified 88 sites on their DNA that strongly linked methylation to age. They replicated their findings in 31 men and 29 women, aged 18 to 70, in the general population.

The team then created a predictive model using two of the three genes with the strongest age-related link to methylation. When they entered the data from the saliva samples taken from the twins and people in the other group, the test correctly predicted their ages within five years.

“Methylation’s relationship with age is so strong that we can identify how old someone is by examining just two of the 3 billion building blocks that make up our genome,” study author Sven Bocklandt, a former UCLA geneticist now at Bioline, said in the university release.

The research appears online June 22 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Physicians might use this test to evaluate patients’ risk of age-related diseases, the researchers suggested.

“Doctors could predict your medical risk for a particular disease and customize treatment based on your DNA’s true biological age, as opposed to how old you are,” Vilain said. “By eliminating costly and unnecessary tests, we could target those patients who really need them.”

In addition, police could test traces of saliva found at a crime scene, such as that on a coffee cup or cigarette, to get an idea of a criminal suspect’s age.

Giant Weed Can Cause Blisters

Call it the import that nobody wants.

Experts are urging residents of several states to beware of the “giant hogweed,” a tall plant native to Central Asia with umbrella-size flowers containing toxic sap that can cause burns, blisters and, in some cases, even blindness.

“Avoid it at all cost,” Jodi Holt, a professor of plant physiology at University of California, Riverside, told ABC News.

“The sap causes something called phytophotodermatitis when it touches humans,” causing scars and potentially blindness if it comes into contact with the eyes, Holt said. Some cases of blindness occurred after children used the hollow stalks as telescopes.

Heracleum Mantegazzianum, as hogweed is botanically known, is already a concern in the Northeast and spreading fast. Patches of giant hogweed have also been sighted in the Pacific Northwest.

With white blossoms a foot or larger in diameter, giant hogweed towers up to 15 feet tall and thrives in wet, cool places. It is often spotted near homes, roadways, railroad beds and streams, ABC News said.

Crews in several states, including New York, have been charged with seeking out and destroying the invasive species. New York has also set up a giant hogweed hotline — 845-256-3111 — for people to identify sightings.

Typically, large quantities of herbicides are needed to vanquish the plant when found in large patches. Smaller patches can be controlled by hand-cutting the roots, according to published reports.

Giant hogweed has been found and destroyed in three counties of Vermont — Bennington, Washington and Windsor, state plant pathologists reported. And officials in Washington, D.C., are asking residents to be on the lookout for giant hogweed so they can weed out the botanical terrorist, according to news reports.

According to the New York state Department of Environmental Conservation, reactions can occur within 15 minutes when skin contact occurs in conjunction with sunlight. The sap contains a photosensitizing chemical that accelerates sun damage and can result in a serious sunburn. Perspiration can increase the reaction, officials said.

If you spot giant hogweed, don’t try to remove it yourself, experts said. Instead, report the sighting to your state or local department of invasive species control.

“The importance of learning what the plant looks like cannot be overstated,” Holt toldABC News.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has put the giant hogweed near the top of its Federal Noxious Weed list. The agency said the plant has been reported in Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Washington and Vermont.

Too Many Meds May Be More Problem

arely a week goes by, it seems, without some company announcing a new pill designed to help you live a longer,healthier life.

Medication can, indeed, do a lot toward curing, preventing or easing many ills. But taking a fistful of pills each day creates its own set of medical risks, prompting concern among a growing number of physicians and pharmacists that people are simply taking too many medications for their own good.

“As you keep increasing the amount of prescriptions, that increases the chance of having a drug interaction or major side effect,” said Sophia De Monte, a pharmacist in Nesconset, N.Y., and a spokeswoman for the American Pharmacists Association. “It’s exponential. The more you add on, the more chance you’ll have something bad happen.”

It’s a concept called polypharmacy, the use of more medications than someone actually needs. And that means not just prescription drugs but also over-the-counter medications and dietary supplements.

The average American is prescribed medication about 13 times a year, according to a report last year by the Kaiser Family Foundation. But the likelihood of polypharmacy increases as people age. Studies have found that seniors make up 13 percent of the population but account for 30 percent of all drug prescriptions. When elderly patients transfer from hospitals to nursing homes for rehabilitation, it is common for caregivers to have to keep track of nine or more prescribed medications for each person, according to a long-term care report.

The more medications people take, the more likely it is that they’ll experience a problem in three key areas, said De Monte and Norman P. Tomaka, a pharmacist in Melbourne, Fla., including:

  • Drug interactions. Drugs can work against each other in strange ways, and the more medications added to a daily regimen, the greater the risk for an interaction that could affect the person’s health.
  • Drug compliance. Trying to keep track of multiple medications can become too much of a burden, causing people to give up trying to comply with the directions for medication use. “We’ve found that compliance drops 40 percent when you add a second drug to a patient’s regimen, even if they are both once a day,” Tomaka said. A lack of compliance to prescription directions can create a serious health risk. “For example, if you use blood pressure medication sporadically, you may set your blood pressure up to become drug resistant,” he said. Sporadic use of antibiotics can cause infectious bacteria to develop immunity to medications.
  • Side effects. Every medication a person takes comes with its own risk for side effects. Multiple prescriptions and remedies mean a multiplied risk. And once side effects occur, it can be more difficult to track down the problem. “Sometimes those drugs can mask each others’ symptoms,” Tomaka said. “If you get an adverse reaction, you don’t know which one caused it. Then you have a quandary.”

But though the trend has been toward more prescriptions, steps are being taken to safeguard patients’ health.

Doctors and pharmacists are working together to create systems by which patients’ prescription lists are reviewed, with an eye toward minimizing the medications they take, De Monte said.

“The whole goal is to try to fine-tune it,” she said, “working with the patient to get the best medication with the best effects at the minimal amount.”

Researchers also are working on ways to combine drugs that work well together into a single dose, reducing the number of pills people have to keep track of as well as the risk for drug interactions, Tomaka said.

New Drug Targets Underlying

A new drug that targets a faulty protein that causes cystic fibrosis led to improved lung function and fewer symptoms in people with the lung disease, researchers report.

The drug — ivacaftor — is the first to halt the underlying processes that cause the inherited disease, which causes thick, sticky mucus to build up in the lungs and the pancreas and can lead to life-threatening infections, experts said.

“It has a huge significance for the whole cystic fibrosis community,” said study author Dr. Bonnie Ramsey, director of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Seattle Children’s Hospital and a professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine. “It’s the first time we have developed a therapy directed at the abnormal proteins and showing that it can be corrected.”

Only 4 percent to 5 percent of cystic fibrosis patients have the particular genetic variant that the drug is being studied to treat, but for them, the results could mean a significant improvement in their health, said Robert Beall, president and CEO of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

“We’re talking about adding decades to these people’s lives, that’s how profound this drug is,” Beall said.

But Beall and other experts say the drug may end up helping people with other cystic fibrosis genetic variants, including the most common one, D508, one copy of which is present in more than 90 percent of people with cystic fibrosis.

Though ivacaftor (previously known as VX-770) on its own didn’t work all that well in these patients, a trial looking at using ivacaftor in conjunction with another drug is currently under way. Results of that trial are expected in the fall of 2012, said Beall, whose organization has provided funding for VX-770 research.

In the study reported in the Nov. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, 161 patients aged 12 and older were randomly divided into two groups. One received the drug every 12 hours and the other received a placebo. All patients had at least one copy of the G551D mutation.

Researchers could tell the drug was working two weeks after people started taking it and the concentration of chloride in their sweat dropped, for some to levels seen in people without the disease. Very salty sweat is a telltale sign of the disease.

Patients also showed improved lung function, as measured by FEV1, or how much air they could blow out in one second.

“It’s not surprising you would see an effect in two weeks. By changing the hydration of the mucus, you can clear it out better and open up the airways,” Ramsey said. “We saw the improvement across all illness severities … That was very encouraging. We had been very worried once you had the lung damage or the infections you wouldn’t be able to reverse it. That’s not saying the lungs would return to normal, but there was more reversibility than we thought there would be.”

Patients also experienced an average relative change in their lung function of 17 percent. Relative change means relative to where they started. The absolute change was about a 10 percent improvement.

At 48 weeks, patients on the drug were 55 percent less likely to have experienced an exacerbation, or an infection that left them ill and unable to work or hospitalized.

Patients on the drug also gained an average of 7 pounds, a huge feat for someone with cystic fibrosis, experts said. The weight gain brought people who were nutritionally deficient and underweight closer to a normal body weight, Ramsey said.

The results stayed consistent through 48 weeks, and there were few side effects, according to the study.

One in 6 Cell Phones in Britain Contaminated With ‘Fecal Matter’

One in six cell phones in Britain may be contaminated with fecal matter that can spread E. coli, likely because so many people don’t wash their hands properly after using the toilet, a new study contends.

The findings also suggest that many people lie about their hygiene habits, according to the researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Queen Mary, University of London.

The study authors went to 12 cities and collected 390 samples from the cell phones and hands of volunteers, who were also asked about their hand-washing habits.

Ninety-five percent of the participants told the researchers that they washed their hands with soap and water where possible. However, lab tests revealed that 92 percent of phones and 82 percent of hands had bacteria on them. The researchers also found that 16 percent of hands and 16 percent of cell phones harbored E. coli bacteria, which is found in feces and can cause serious illness.

The study was released to coincide with Global Handwashing Day on Oct. 15.

“This study provides more evidence that some people still don’t wash their hands properly, especially after going to the toilet. I hope the thought of having E. coli on their hands and phones encourages them to take more care in the bathroom — washing your hands with soap is such a simple thing to do but there is no doubt it saves lives,” Dr. Val Curtis, a hygiene expert at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and U.K. campaign leader for Global Handwashing Day, said in a school news release.

“Our analysis revealed some interesting results from around the U.K. While some cities did much better than others, the fact that E. coli was present on phones and hands in every location shows this is a nationwide problem. People may claim they wash their hands regularly but the science shows otherwise,” Dr. Ron Cutler, of Queen Mary, University of London, said in the news release.

Hand-washing with soap can prevent a number of illnesses caused by bacteria and viruses.

The Best Diet for COPD

Finding the right diet can be tricky for people withchronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but critical. They need to eat a healthy diet and maintain their optimal weight to keep COPD symptoms in check.

COPD: The Impact of Body Weight

For COPD patients, maintaining a healthy weight is important for controlling symptoms.

“If you’re overweight, you have to carry more of that weight around, making you feel more short of breath,” says Barry Make, MD, co-director of the COPD program at National Jewish Health in Denver and a professor of medicine at National Jewish and the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine. Having more weight to carry around can increase shortness of breath, which is one of the primary symptoms of COPD. Being overweight also increased your risk for heart disease and diabetes, chronic diseases that can undermine your efforts at COPD management.

That said, it’s even more crucial for COPD patients not to be underweight. “Being overweight is bad, but being underweight is even worse in COPD patients,” Dr. Make says. “A lot of COPD patients want to lose weight, but we tell them not to lose too much.” According to Make, a low body weight when you have COPD is associated with a poorer prognosis, meaning a worse long-term outlook. In addition, not weighing enough can zap your energy, making it difficult to adhere to your COPD management plan.

COPD: Nutrition Tips

Talk with your COPD medical team about the nutrition plan that is best for you. They may recommend that you see a nutritionist, who can work with you to develop a meal plan to best meet your needs and monitor your progress along the way.

In general, people who have COPD should consider the following for a healthy diet:

  • Monitor calories: The American Lung Association (ALA) recommends that people with COPD keep close tabs on their weight. If you are overweight, you can lose weight by eating fewer calories. But don’t eat so few calories that you feel fatigued and hungry all the time. If you need to focus on maintaining or increasing your body weight, talk with your medical team or nutritionist about the foods you should be eating to keep the weight on.
  • Avoid fad diets: “Fad diets are not appropriate for COPD patients,” Make says. People with COPD appear to fare best with a varied diet that provides a good balance of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and lean proteins, according to research published in 2014 in the International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. This helps ensure that you’re getting vitamins such as C, E, and D, which are among those tied to better outcomes with COPD.
  • Focus on protein: Work with your medical team or nutritionist to determine the amount of protein you need. “A lot of people do not get enough protein in their diet,” says Make. The ALA recommends milk, eggs, cheese, meat, fish, poultry, nuts, and beans as protein sources.
  • Get enough fiber: Aim for 20 to 30 grams of fiber daily, the ALA recommends. Sources of fiber include whole-grain breads and pastas, nuts, vegetables, and fruit.
  • Watch your portions: “We tell our COPD patients to eat small meals frequently, rather than large meals,” Make says. According to the ALA, this strategy can help lessen shortness of breath.
  • Limit salt: Consuming excessive sodium can lead to fluid retention, which can worsen your shortness of breath. The American Heart Association recommends eating less than 2,400 milligrams of salt daily.
  • Remember your oxygen: If your medical team recommends it, use supplemental oxygen during and after meals to reduce shortness of breath when eating.

A healthy diet is an important part of a COPD treatment plan. Eating the right foods can help manage your symptoms, make you feel better overall, increase your energy level, and give your body the fuel it needs to fight infection. It takes energy to breathe when you have COPD, so feed your body well.