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Can Stress Making You Fat ?

 If you don’t keep your stress levels in check, it may be tougher to stay slim.

That’s the takeaway from a study published Thursday in the journal Obesity, which suggests chronically elevated levels of the stress hormone cortisol can increase the risk of being overweight or obese.

Researchers tracked about 2,500 men and women ages 54 and older for four years, periodically taking hair samples to analyze their cortisol levels. Previous studies have linked spiked cortisol levels to weight gain, but samples involved blood, saliva and urine, which are less reliable than hair because they can change day to day. Study authors also recorded participants’ weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference.

Although the authors said their findings are limited due to the restrictive older population, all of who were white men and women, they noted that there was a clear association among elevated cortisol and a larger waistline, heavier weight, and higher BMI — a scale to measure body fat based on weight in relation to height.

“People who had higher hair cortisol levels

The 7 best foods to help you shed pounds

 To get the scoop on the foods that can help you get to that target weight, Fox News talked to Lauren Blake, RD, LDN, manager of sports nutrition at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, to find out how to eat your way to the body of your dreams.

Avocado

Despite previous attitudes toward fat, the healthy kind shouldn’t be your foe, a 2016 study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology suggests. Avocado contains healthy fats that can help you stay full and satisfied, Blake said. “I like to call avocado nature’s butter,” Blake, who recommended smearing it on a piece of whole-wheat toast, told Fox News. “If I don’t have avocado in my house, it’s time to go to the store!”

Berries

A 2015 study published in the journal BMJ found that people whose diets were rich in flavonoids — which are present in foods like berries, onions and even wine — tended to gain less weight as they aged. Blake is also a fan of them for their high fiber and water

Kidney damage diagnosis may be inaccurate

 In a related Comment published today in The Lancet, Jonathan Barasch, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and pathology and cell biology at CUMC, and colleagues Drs. Joseph Bonventre (Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital) and Richard Zager (University of Washington Medicine) explain that the blood test, which measures serum creatinine — a waste product that is removed by the kidneys and excreted in urine — only offers a snapshot of the kidney’s function at a given moment, which can vary depending on individual factors such as body size and muscle mass.

Each year, an estimated 5-7 percent of patients admitted to hospitals in the U.S. and 30-50 percent of patients in critical or intensive care settings, are diagnosed with acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the true degree of injury cannot be known for many days because creatinine tests only provide a retrospective look at the kidney’s response to possible injury. In addition, the blood test can register “positive” for AKI even when the kidney may not have been injured.

“Nephrologists are trained to evaluate a constellation of factors in

Sex is healthy when it is natural

Sex is a normal action for any living organism. Be it humans, animals, birds or reptiles. Without sex, reproduction or survival is not possible. Reproduction happens when the male genital fluid fuses with the ovum of the female. It happens when the semen containing the sperm, flows through the female reproductive tract and fuses with the ovum in the uterus. When the healthy spermatozoa fertilize the ovum, reproduction starts. The semen contains 400 to 500 million sperm in its fluid. But only one healthy sperm fertilizes the ovary. If this does not happen, the male is said to be impotent. Impotency is the inefficiency to get conceived.

Natural ways of penis enlargement

Impotency or sperm ejaculation becomes a failure when the penis is not fully erect. Half erect penis also fails to eject the sperm. It is important to naturally increase the size of the penis. Exercise helps in increasing the size of the penis to about 18 cm by pumping blood to the penis tissue present inside. This will automatically erect the penis and keeps it erected

Online websites that deliver food supplements at our doorstep!

Everyone wants to lead a healthy and a happy life which is possible only with the proper maintenance of their body health. In order to remain healthy, balanced intake of nutrition contents, minerals vitamins, proteins are essential. This is not easy as people think, especially not with the current environmental changes and the modified lifestyles. Thus it becomes necessary to have a basic understanding of the nutrition requirements of the human body. Food supplements that we consume play a major role in determining the health of the individual. Fruits and vegetables are the natural sources of these nutrient compounds. Thus consuming them would be the ideal way for restoring the energy to the human body. But with the increased business processes, it provides us with the little time to look for the food supplements. But with the improvement in the technology has provided us the solution. These food supplements are made available online so it becomes an easy task to place an order from these products. Even the fruit juices are made available online which in turn could be referred as ejuice.

How to Eat a Healthy Diet

If you are what you eat, it follows that you want to stick to a healthy diet that’s well balanced. “You want to eat a variety of foods,” says Stephen Bickston, MD, AGAF, professor of internal medicine and director of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center at Virginia Commonwealth University Health Center in Richmond. “You don’t want to be overly restrictive of any one food group or eat too much of another.”

Healthy Diet: The Building Blocks

The best source of meal planning for most Americans is the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food Pyramid. The pyramid, updated in 2005, suggests that for a healthy diet each day you should eat:

  • 6 to 8 servings of grains. These include bread, cereal, rice, and pasta, and at least 3 servings should be from whole grains. A serving of bread is one slice while a serving of cereal is 1/2 (cooked) to 1 cup (ready-to-eat). A serving of rice or pasta is 1/2 cup cooked (1 ounce dry). Save fat-laden baked goods such as croissants, muffins, and donuts for an occasional treat.
  • 2 to 4 servings of fruits and 4 to

The Truth About Radiation Exposure

Japan’s ongoing nuclear crisis understandably has people around the world worried about radiation exposure and the potential health risks it may pose. According to the latest reports, radiation from Japan was detected in Southern California late this week, but experts are quick to point out that the levels are far from dangerous. The readings were “about a billion times beneath levels that would be health threatening,” a diplomat with access to United Nations’ radiation tracking told the Associated Press.

Nor is it unexpected. “Whenever radioactive particles get in the atmosphere, they have the potential to spread around the world,” says James Thrall, MD, president of the American College of Radiology. “But they get diluted as they travel, so they’re unlikely to pose any real health problem.”

In fact, we’re probably exposed to significantly more radiation every day than the miniscule fallout arriving from Japan. Here’s a quick tutorial on radiation to put our collective anxiety in perspective:

What Is Radiation?

Radiation is a form of energy in waves. It exists on a spectrum, with low-frequency radiation (from radio waves and microwaves) on the low end and high-frequency radiation (from gamma rays and x-rays) on

Simple Saliva Test Detects Your ‘Real’ Age

A new test that uses a saliva sample to predict a person’s age within a five-year range could prove useful in solving crimes and improving patient care, University of California, Los Angeles geneticists say.

Their test focuses on a process called methylation, a chemical modification of one of the four building blocks that make up DNA.

“While genes partly shape how our body ages, environmental influences also can change our DNA as we age. Methylation patterns shift as we grow older and contribute to aging-related disease,” principal investigator Dr. Eric Vilain, a professor of human genetics, pediatrics and urology, said in a UCLA news release.

He and his colleagues analyzed saliva samples from 34 pairs of identical male twins, aged 21 to 55, and identified 88 sites on their DNA that strongly linked methylation to age. They replicated their findings in 31 men and 29 women, aged 18 to 70, in the general population.

The team then created a predictive model using two of the three genes with the strongest age-related link to methylation. When they entered the data from the saliva samples taken from the twins and people in the other group, the

Giant Weed Can Cause Blisters

Call it the import that nobody wants.

Experts are urging residents of several states to beware of the “giant hogweed,” a tall plant native to Central Asia with umbrella-size flowers containing toxic sap that can cause burns, blisters and, in some cases, even blindness.

“Avoid it at all cost,” Jodi Holt, a professor of plant physiology at University of California, Riverside, told ABC News.

“The sap causes something called phytophotodermatitis when it touches humans,” causing scars and potentially blindness if it comes into contact with the eyes, Holt said. Some cases of blindness occurred after children used the hollow stalks as telescopes.

Heracleum Mantegazzianum, as hogweed is botanically known, is already a concern in the Northeast and spreading fast. Patches of giant hogweed have also been sighted in the Pacific Northwest.

With white blossoms a foot or larger in diameter, giant hogweed towers up to 15 feet tall and thrives in wet, cool places. It is often spotted near homes, roadways, railroad beds and streams, ABC News said.

Crews in several states, including New York, have been charged with seeking out and destroying the invasive species. New York has also set up

Too Many Meds May Be More Problem

arely a week goes by, it seems, without some company announcing a new pill designed to help you live a longer,healthier life.

Medication can, indeed, do a lot toward curing, preventing or easing many ills. But taking a fistful of pills each day creates its own set of medical risks, prompting concern among a growing number of physicians and pharmacists that people are simply taking too many medications for their own good.

“As you keep increasing the amount of prescriptions, that increases the chance of having a drug interaction or major side effect,” said Sophia De Monte, a pharmacist in Nesconset, N.Y., and a spokeswoman for the American Pharmacists Association. “It’s exponential. The more you add on, the more chance you’ll have something bad happen.”

It’s a concept called polypharmacy, the use of more medications than someone actually needs. And that means not just prescription drugs but also over-the-counter medications and dietary supplements.

The average American is prescribed medication about 13 times a year, according to a report last year by the Kaiser Family Foundation. But the likelihood of polypharmacy increases as people age. Studies have found that seniors make up 13 percent

New Drug Targets Underlying

A new drug that targets a faulty protein that causes cystic fibrosis led to improved lung function and fewer symptoms in people with the lung disease, researchers report.

The drug — ivacaftor — is the first to halt the underlying processes that cause the inherited disease, which causes thick, sticky mucus to build up in the lungs and the pancreas and can lead to life-threatening infections, experts said.

“It has a huge significance for the whole cystic fibrosis community,” said study author Dr. Bonnie Ramsey, director of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Seattle Children’s Hospital and a professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine. “It’s the first time we have developed a therapy directed at the abnormal proteins and showing that it can be corrected.”

Only 4 percent to 5 percent of cystic fibrosis patients have the particular genetic variant that the drug is being studied to treat, but for them, the results could mean a significant improvement in their health, said Robert Beall, president and CEO of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

“We’re talking about adding decades to these people’s lives, that’s how profound this drug is,” Beall

One in 6 Cell Phones in Britain Contaminated With ‘Fecal Matter’

One in six cell phones in Britain may be contaminated with fecal matter that can spread E. coli, likely because so many people don’t wash their hands properly after using the toilet, a new study contends.

The findings also suggest that many people lie about their hygiene habits, according to the researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Queen Mary, University of London.

The study authors went to 12 cities and collected 390 samples from the cell phones and hands of volunteers, who were also asked about their hand-washing habits.

Ninety-five percent of the participants told the researchers that they washed their hands with soap and water where possible. However, lab tests revealed that 92 percent of phones and 82 percent of hands had bacteria on them. The researchers also found that 16 percent of hands and 16 percent of cell phones harbored E. coli bacteria, which is found in feces and can cause serious illness.

The study was released to coincide with Global Handwashing Day on Oct. 15.

“This study provides more evidence that some people still don’t wash their hands properly, especially after going to the

The Best Diet for COPD

Finding the right diet can be tricky for people withchronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but critical. They need to eat a healthy diet and maintain their optimal weight to keep COPD symptoms in check.

COPD: The Impact of Body Weight

For COPD patients, maintaining a healthy weight is important for controlling symptoms.

“If you’re overweight, you have to carry more of that weight around, making you feel more short of breath,” says Barry Make, MD, co-director of the COPD program at National Jewish Health in Denver and a professor of medicine at National Jewish and the University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine. Having more weight to carry around can increase shortness of breath, which is one of the primary symptoms of COPD. Being overweight also increased your risk for heart disease and diabetes, chronic diseases that can undermine your efforts at COPD management.

That said, it’s even more crucial for COPD patients not to be underweight. “Being overweight is bad, but being underweight is even worse in COPD patients,” Dr. Make says. “A lot of COPD patients want to lose weight, but we tell them not to lose too much.” According to Make, a

Chemical Found in Blood Holds

Even within the normal range, higher bilirubin levels appear to be associated with reduced risks of lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and death, a longitudinal, prospective analysis of a large database showed.

For every 0.1-mg/dL increase in bilirubin level, the rate of lung cancer dropped by 8 percent in men and 11 percent in women, according to Laura Horsfall, MSc, of University College London, and colleagues.

In addition, the same incremental increase in bilirubin was associated with a 6 percent decline in the rate of COPD and a 3 percent decline in mortality for both sexes, the researchers reported in the Feb. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

“Based on our findings, bilirubin levels within the normal range appear to capture information about patients that may reflect a combination of environmental and genetically determined susceptibility to respiratory diseases,” they wrote.

Most people are familiar with bilirubin because of its role in jaundice — the yellowing of the skin that is sometimes seen in newborns but is also associated with liver disease.

Bilirubin is actually a byproduct of the turn over of red blood cells — the

Walking Can Helps Brain And Heart

Regular aerobic exercise such as walking may protect the memory center in the brain, while stretching exercise may cause the center — called the hippocampus — to shrink, researchers reported.

In a randomized study involving men and women in their mid-60s, walking three times a week for a year led to increases in the volume of the hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory, according to Dr. Arthur Kramer, of the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in Urbana, Ill., and colleagues.

On the other hand, control participants who took stretching classes saw drops in the volume of the hippocampus, Kramer and colleagues reported online in theProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The findings suggest that it’s possible to overcome the age-related decline in hippocampal volume with only moderate exercise, Kramer told MedPage Today, leading to better fitness and perhaps to better spatial memory. “I don’t see a down side to it,” he said.

The volume of the hippocampus is known to fall with age by between 1 percent and 2 percent a year, the researchers noted, leading to impaired memory and increased risk for dementia.

But animal research suggests that exercise

How Seat Belts Save Lives ?

It’s been proven time and again, on back roads and superhighways: A seat belt can save a life in a car accident. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), more than 15,000 lives are saved each year in the United States because drivers and their passengers were wearing seat belts when they were in accidents.

Seat Belt Safety: 5-Way Protection

“Seat belts prevent occupants of the vehicle from serious injury in five ways,” says Angela Osterhuber, director of the Pennsylvania Traffic Injury Prevention Project in Media, Pa. A seat belt:

  • Keeps the occupants of the vehicle inside. “It’s clearly a myth that people are better off being thrown clear from the crash,” Osterhuber says. “People thrown from a vehicle are four times more likely to be killed than those who remain inside.”
  • Restrains the strongest parts of the body. “Restraints are designed to contact your body at its strongest parts. For an older child and adult, these parts are the hips and shoulders, which is where the seat belt should be strapped,” Osterhuber says.
  • Spreads out any force from the collision. “Lap-and-shoulder belts spread the force of the crash over a wide area of

7 Ways to Fit In Exercise

The benefits of regular exercise are unrivaled: Physical activity can help you lose weight and prevent a host of ailments, including heart disease, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Being fit also can help you stay mentally sharp.

While most people know they should exercise, you may not know where to start or how to fit it into a busy schedule. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that healthy adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity spread out over five days a week, or 20 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity on each of three days a week.

“This is something we recommend to all Americans,” says Gerald Fletcher, MD, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., and a spokesman for the AHA.

An ideal fitness routine also includes resistance or weight training to improve muscle strength and endurance. The ACSM and the AHA recommend that most adults engage in resistance training at least twice a week.

Finding Fitness: 7 Ways to Get in Exercise

Sometimes the problem isn’t motivation — it’s simply finding the time. But scheduling exercise isn’t as difficult as

Surgery Effective for Tough-to-Treat Epilepsy

Surgery can significantly improve seizure control and quality of life among people with epilepsy, according to a study stretching over 26 years.

“This study may be the longest follow-up of epilepsy surgery patients in that it spans three decades, during which there were several eras of neuroimaging [brain-scanning] techniques,” said Dr. Cynthia Harden, chief of the division of epilepsy and electroencephalography at the Cushing Neuroscience Institute, part of North Shore-LIJ Health System in Great Neck, N.Y. She was not involved in the study.

The research team, led by Dr. Matthew Smyth with Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, argued that the findings could have an impact on the way the disease is treated.

As reported Feb. 7 in the journal Epilepsia, they followed 361 patients who had epilepsy surgery over the course of 26 years to determine how the operation affected their condition.

Although drug therapy remains the primary treatment option for people with epilepsy, the study’s authors found that surgery stopped 48 percent of the patients from having seizures and improved the quality of life of 80 percent of those studied.

“In cases where medical [drug] therapy fails to

More Success With Gene Therapy

As a child, Tami Morehouse had vision problems. She struggled to read the blackboard at school, and homework took hours.

Yet, she made it through high school and college, and became a social worker. Although she was never able to drive, she learned to ride a bike.

But in her 30s, with three young children, her vision took a turn for the worse. “I’d be reading a book and the words faded away,” she said.

Morehouse was going blind, the result of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a rare inherited eye disease that causes a progressive loss of vision. “As my kids needed me more and more, I was able to do less and less,” Morehouse said.

That changed in 2009, when she was one of 12 people to undergo an experimental treatment using gene therapy in one eye. Now, scientists report even more progress, having successfully treated the second eye of three patients, including Morehouse. The new results are published Feb. 8 in Science Translational Medicine.

LCA is caused by a faulty gene, RPE65, that fails to produce an enzyme needed by the retina, the tissue in the back of the eye

Omega-3 Fatty Acids Can Protect The Aging Brain

Middle-aged and elderly adults who regularly eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids may slow the mental decline that leads to dementia, according to a new study.

Researchers found that people with the highest blood levels of these essential fatty acids — found in fish such as salmon and tuna — were more likely to perform well on tests of mental functioning and to experience less age-related brain shrinkage.

“We feel fatty acid consumption exerts a beneficial effect on brain aging by promoting vascular health,” said study lead author Dr. Zaldy Tan, an associate professor in the Easton Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and the division of geriatrics at the University of California, Los Angeles. This might include reducing blood pressure and inflammation, he added.

Previous research linked dementia risk with the amount of omega-3 fatty acids in blood plasma, which reflects how much people had eaten in the past few days. But in the current work, researchers could estimate the amount of omega-3s that participants had consumed in the past several months by looking at how much had built up in their red blood cells.

“This represents their average intake of fatty

22 Ways to Relax in 5 Minutes or Less

Food and Drink

Sip Green Tea: Instead of turning purple with rage, get green with a cup of herbal tea. Green tea is a source of L-Theanine, a chemical that helps relieve anger. Boil the water, pour it out, and take a soothing sip — there’s probably still a minute to spare.

Nosh on Chocolate: A carton of chocolate ice cream is no stranger to stress relief, but just a square (about 1.4 ounces) of the sweet stuff can also calm your nerves. Dark chocolate regulates levels of the stress hormone cortisol and stabilizes metabolism.

Slurp Some Honey: Replace stress with sweetness and try a spoonful of honey. Besides being a natural skin moisturizer and antibiotic, honey also provides compounds that reduce inflammation in the brain, meaning it fights depression and anxiety.

Bite Into a Mango: Take a tropical vacation without leaving the desk chair. Use a five-minute break to peel, slice, and bite into a juicy mango, which packs a compound called linalool that helps lower stress levels. Don’t fret about the juice dripping down your chin — the stress relief is worth the mess.

Chew Gum: Minty, fruity, or bubble-gum

Reducing Ozone Limits Would Save Lives

Enforcing the current federal ozone standard would significantly reduce ozone-related illnesses and deaths in the United States, and introducing tighter restrictions on ozone would lead to even greater reductions, a new study suggests.

There’s ample evidence that exposure to ozone is linked with health issues such as lung problems, asthma exacerbation, more hospital and emergency department visits, and increased risk of death, according to study author Jesse Berman, a doctoral candidate at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

The current Environmental Protection Agency’s eight-hour average ozone standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) is often exceeded, Berman noted.

Ozone is commonly referred to as smog.

The researchers analyzed ozone monitoring and health data for 2005-07 and estimated that 1,410 to 2,480 ozone-related premature deaths would have been prevented during that time if the current ozone standard had been met.

A lower standard of 70 ppb would have prevented 2,450 to 4,130 deaths and a standard of 60 ppb would have prevented 5,210 to 7,990 deaths, the study contended.

If the current standard would have been met, there would have been 3 million fewer cases of acute respiratory symptoms and 1 million